Archive for the Media Category

Anti-Trump: Catalyst for a New Organized Left, or more Dead-End Cult of Personality?

Posted in Capitalism, Elections, Media, News, Politics, USA with tags , , , on January 20, 2017 by Z

As anti-Trump protests sweep across the USA, I am reminded of the signs of ill health I saw in the Bernie Sanders camp at the end of the primaries (link here).  Just as Bernie’s cult of personality threatens to act as a barrier to genuine political consciousness for many of his followers, so too does the photo negative that is Trump’s own cult.  I hope there are protesters out there trying to use this outcry to educate and organize, but much of what I’ve seen today (as presented by mainstream media, so that’s something to bear in mind) seems focused on Trump the individual; his vulgarity, his character, his personal history – not the broader social trends and policy direction in which he is situated.  Assuming Trump maintains his apparent course, we’ll have four years before this potential resistance begins losing people who failed to learn any broader lessons, meaning we have four years to teach those lessons.  There were organizations participating today that definitely understand this.  With luck, the cheeto-in-chief will provide enough vulgar provocations to maintain this anti-Trump coalition, which has at the very least already provided more opposition to any looming Trump disasters than was faced by the previous administration, which certainly dealt enough damage of its own.

Put on your helmets and strap in.  It looks like we’re going full accelerationsim.  At the very least, it will be interesting.  Probably very unpleasant, but interesting.

Belated Holiday Greeting and Assorted Grumbling (Did somebody say Putin?)

Posted in Elections, Europe, Media, News, Politics, USA with tags , , , on January 15, 2017 by Z

My assessment of the holidays can be pretty fairly summed up by the following:

 

Much more efficient than a bunch of words.

On the upside, if it turns out I forgot to give someone a gift, I imagine I’ll be able to get off the hook by claiming Putin hacked my amazon account. “Wow, sorry man. I didn’t forget; it’s those damn Russians. They must have changed the shipping address to the Trump tower!”

Can you believe 50% of Clinton voters think Russia “tampered with vote tallies” to elect Trump? Even the “free” press hasn’t claimed that. If anyone needed it, this should serve as final proof that Democrats are just as dumb as Republicans, who of course were overwhelmingly likely to believe Iraq was involved in 9/11, despite no news outlet actually making that claim. Republicans clearly aren’t the only ones not actually reading the articles. The Dems, too, are absorbing suggestive headlines at an alarming rate and verifying nothing. I’m also getting a little fed up with the hyperbolic accusations that seem to be levied at anyone questioning the Evil Russia story. On the other hand, it is remarkable that the Democrat talking heads have managed to achieve red baiting without reds. I was sure that was against the rules (Walter: “Without a hostage, there is no ransom. Those are the fucking rules!”), but apparently not (“We still want the money, Lebowski.”). Hey, maybe I can get paid without working.

The unRed baiting going on is particularly interesting because it centers on accusations that Russia influenced an election in another nation, which the US did in spades following the collapse of the Soviet Union. In fact, the US intervened in Russian elections (see above) to keep Boris Yeltsin in office – because he was propping up the disaster of shock therapy and the slapdash privatization favoring former managers and party officials that it entailed (and embezzling a little something for himself, as well). That’s the same Boris Yeltsin, by the way, who selected one Vladimir Putin as his acting prime minister and successor, meaning US intervention in Russian elections is what set the stage for Putin’s current role in the first place. Putin is not some epic evil that passed through a membrane from another reality – he is simply a politician caught in the unenviable position of having to navigate the wreckage that is post-soviet casino capitalist kleptocracy by playing various oligarch factions against each other while riding assorted waves of popular discontent ultimately traceable to the gross mishandling of the soviet breakup by Yeltsin and co. He isn’t Putin, Bringer of Homophobia (Russia has a population that has long had a sizeable homophobic contingent – even before ol’ Vlad), he’s just the leader of a dysfunctional semi-democracy trying to rebuild itself following Yeltsonian idiocy. His popularity in Russia largely stems from the simple fact that he presided over a vast improvement in the Russian standard of living, which had plummeted after the Soviet breakup due to the aforementioned shock therapy reforms, which led to a catastrophic drop in GDP and hyperinflation that would have shocked a Weimar German. Large scale barter economies existed throughout Russia during those years, so useless did hyper inflated currency become in certain areas. We didn’t learn any of this in the US, of course. Obviously, we assumed, the arrival of American style democracy meant everything was instantly ok in Russia, so there was no need to actually look at the real conditions – at least as far as our media was concerned. Those unfamiliar with Russia’s internal politics may be forgiven for not realizing that absent Putin’s maneuvering, the leaders of Russia might well have been Zyuganov’s communist party – decent folks, but generally not full of new ideas – or contemptible fascist cartoons like Zhirinovsky or Limonov – not decent folks at all. I, of course, would have preferred Zyuganov over Putin, but many who currently rant about Putin-as-anti-christ would probably like Zyuganov considerably less. No one outside of the neofascist right wants Zhirinovsky or Limonov in power. I wouldn’t want those nuts in charge of so much as a Dairy Queen, never mind a nuclear armed world power. Whatever objections one may have to Putin (and there are perfectly valid objections among which one may choose), realize that Putin is a vital rearguard against far, far worse. You think Trump’s bad news? Be glad Putin has largely neutralized Zhirinovsky.  The fantasy that Putin is all that stands between Russia and utopian democracy under the mild and benevolent Garry Kasparov is exactly that. “Blame Putin!” is ahistorical nonsense. Russia’s problems, as with those of any nation, are far larger than any one individual, and all possible systems are not available in every historical circumstance. Frankly, given the conditions Russia endured during the 90s, it’s amazing any pretense of democracy exists there at all.

Finally, can someone please explain why so many of the right wingers I’ve come across lately are obsessed with Saul Alinsky? On at least five occasions recently (internet and real life), I’ve witnessed a slew of complaints aimed at “Campus radicals” allegedly acting as his disciples. Do young leftists these days actually read Alinsky? I was one of those “Campus radicals” and I’ve never read a single word of his, nor have any of my fellows, then or now. Based on what I’ve been hearing, you’d think the man was the only left leaning author available. I’m sure he’s a nice guy (actually, I have no idea) but next to the vast number of far more important thinkers out there, he always struck me as a footnote; a man of his era, with little relevance beyond it, the kind of guy liberals read when they want to convince themselves they’re on the cutting edge. Why don’t these people pick on Marx or Fanon? Maybe Gramsci? Surely the right could get some mileage out of mocking Mao’s lil’ red. Even our marginally coherent political tribalism is lazy these days.

Finally, as recently as a week ago it was over 50 degrees Fahrenheit. In New England. In January. I went outside in sandals and it was no problem. This is definitely the golden age of global warming. We’ll no doubt look back fondly on this mild weather in the future, as we drown / burn / starve, etc. Ah, nostalgia.

Is this Election Stuff still going on?

Posted in Bad Faith, Elections, Media, Politics, USA with tags on June 8, 2016 by Z

I kid.  Of course it is.  There’s perhaps less to talk about now, since the lack of exit polls this time around means no fun fraud spotting in Cali or Jersey.  It all seems so dull, though it is fun to note that the response of our “media” to the realization that the exit polls weren’t within the usual margin of the actual results wasn’t to question the legitimacy of the vote (as they would do in many other nations), but instead to conclude that exit polls are no longer necessary.  Not very subtle, guys.

Moving on to the people whose opinions actually have some effect on policy, Lee Fang over at The Intercept has a short piece up on Pfizer chief executive Ian Read, who “said that he cannot ‘at this moment distinguish between the policies that Donald Trump may support or those that Hillary Clinton may support.'”  Don’t feel bad, Ian.  Neither can I.  So here we are, barring some sort of maple flavored Vermontish surprise, back at our usual party A versus party a “democracy.”  (Let’s ignore Bernie’s military Keynesianism again for the moment.  We all know it’s there).  At least we’re familiar with this position, as we approach Bad Faith 2016.  There is one slim hope still ahead – that protesters at the Dem’s convention may ’68 the lot of them.  We’re due.

I Have Returned

Posted in Announcements, Elections, Media, News, Politics, USA with tags , , , on April 9, 2016 by Z

I have returned.

Actually, I never went anywhere at all, but I do believe I’ve found the time to get this place moving again, if only just barely. Wrong With Sartre is back; the irregular posting, unreliable moderation and slow comment section very few of you were used to has risen again.

Recognizing that a blog in the age of TwitFace is at least mildly anachronistic and that just about any contribution to the “discourse” of the internet is like throwing a message in a bottle into a sea composed entirely of messages in bottles, I’m likely going to be a little more free form in my prose from here on out, though I will try to maintain some scholarly rigor where appropriate.

I’ve been watching this election stuff play out, so let’s reopen with some primary rambling. Many of my friends are quite enthusiastic about Bernie Sanders, which is fair enough when you consider the context (i.e. the American political spectrum as it now exists). True, he’s not a socialist (get back to me when he calls for worker control of the means of production. I’ll wait.), but a euro-flavored FDR is as close an approximation as the system can produce. Recognizing this unfortunate circumstance, I can’t summon up any anger at those prepared to go all in for him. In any case, it is probably the smart play; pushing the Dems to the left, even if only slightly, even if only temporarily, may create intellectual space for some to find the actual left. Who knows, maybe a rift in the Dems themselves is even possible. There are of course those who fear Bernie’s mislabeled Keynesianism may damage socialism in the long run, and their fears are not without merit, though I feel I must point out that further damage to socialism in the US is a laughable threat at best. Socialism in the US has already been through Blair Mountain, the Soviet Ark, HUAC and a raft of ill-conceived but mind bogglingly effective misinformation, not to mention the dubious legacies of certain self-identified socialist regimes. It’s difficult to believe that Bernie’s nomenclature confusion is capable of an inadvertent death blow at this point (there is also the increasingly likely bitter truth that, in light of the European socialist parties’ craven capitulation to austerity, communism and anarchism may be the only remaining positions with any integrity. If the establishment is intent on packing us all into brakeless freight trains barreling toward Lenin and Bakunin, so fucking be it. Game on, shitstain).

What was I saying? Oh, right. Bernie. I voted for him in my state’s primary, and I’ve tossed some cash his way, despite his military Keynesianism and social democratic (not socialist) economic perspective. He is as far to the right as a candidate can be and still have a fighting chance for my vote – in so far as that’s even worth anything in a neoliberal duopoly. A solid threat from a populist small donor funded campaign is also a good precedent to set. I do find myself liking his supporters, or at least those of them who recognize the need to show moral courage in the face of lesser evilist crackpot realism by proclaiming themselves “Bernie or bust” (i.e. no support for the center-right Clintonian scourge). I even saw one guy phrase it this way: “Bern it up or burn it down.” Magnificent.

The Bernie situation has also produced an MSNBC(!) interview with Susan Sarandon in which the concept of sharpening the contradictions is mentioned. Is this the same USA that played host to “Russian spy,” the schoolyard game of my late Cold War childhood? You know, the game in which the poorly defined rules call for one player to be designated a “Russian spy,” then promptly chased around the field by other children with improvised weapons? (My grandfather’s family, mostly Volga Germans, came here from Russia, so guess who was often assigned the titular role).

In any case, Harry Belafonte has gone to bat for the Sandman, and who am I to argue with the King of Calypso? I’m willing to see where this goes, even if I suspect the answer is nowhere.

Well, that was quite a comeback rant. Let’s slow things down a bit and cover some specific things that have been driving me up a wall about the primaries.

I. The sheer level of contempt for the American people from our own political class.  Sure, this is not and has never been much of a secret, but it’s been so out and obvious this time around, I can’t help but mention it. They’re not even trying to cover it up now. We’ve got Rahm Emmanuel calling half his party’s voters “retards,” Gloria Steinem implying that young women are only interested in sex, so much suspicious activity around polling places and caucus sites that there’s a whole blog now dedicated to possible election fraud for just this year, just the primary, just for Democrats and we’ve got campaign claims and rhetoric that can only be coming from people who believe we have not only no historical memory, but also no capacity to reason. To wit:

  1. Claims from Clinton lackeys that Sanders has run a “negative” campaign. Are we seeing the same material? All he’s done is mention things Clinton has actually done. If we’re to believe that’s negative, that would imply that we don’t like what Clinton has done … which would be on her, am I right?
  2. Near universal deliberately obtuse idiocy on the part of the media. Nothing more needs to be said here. (If someone could possibly bullseye Chuck Todd’s face with a pie or something, that would be great).
  3. I tend to run significantly behind on social media news, and so just read up on the “Bernie Bros” thing recently. It’s remarkably similar to the “Obama boys” thing from the 2008 mess, and The Intercept has suggested it may be largely made up. But let’s assume it isn’t. Let’s assume there really is a horde of contemptible misogynists supporting Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders is running on (among other things) pay equity for women, paid maternity leave, protecting abortion and tuition free college (more than 50% of college students are women these days, so this is also a women’s issue). This would mean that Bernie Sanders has somehow convinced a horde of contemptible misogynists to vote for possibly the most openly feminist agenda any major party candidate has ever proposed (admittedly not a high bar), which would make him potentially the most effective ally the feminist movement has ever had in the US (see above RE: bar). So which is it? Is this story largely fantasy, or is Bernie able to rally anti-feminists to feminism with a wave of his hand?  (Not to mention how … interesting … it is to hear accusations of sexism coming out of Bill Clinton. It seems odd that Hillary would assign that task to him. Was Cosby not available?)

That’s enough; I’m getting tired. Moving on.

II. The whole “Anyone but Trump!” thing.

  1. “Trump is a fascist!” No, he isn’t. “Fascist” doesn’t just mean an authoritarian you don’t like. It involves a theoretical foundation steakpile just doesn’t have. He doesn’t even have all of the standard fascist negations – anti-marxism (check), anti-liberalism (check, in a selective social issue only sense at most), anti-conservatism (definitely not). Is Trump a jackass willing to rally racists, sexists, homophobes, etc. to his cause?  Yes, he certainly is – but he’s no Mussolini. What he is is the American Berlusconi. He’s bad, yes, but let’s be accurate. We don’t need to further destroy the definition of a word needed intact for historians and political scientists just to signal that we disapprove of an asshat.
  2. Err … he’s actually to the left of Hillary Clinton on trade … and foreign policy … that’s why neocons prefer her to him.
  3. He has mentioned cooperation with Russia. While I doubt he’s aware of this, the idea of US – Russia cooperation was shared by two of our more intelligent presidents, Lincoln and FDR. Lincoln pursued a policy of friendship with Russia so strongly that the Russian Baltic fleet was sent to the east coast and the Pacific fleet to San Francisco during the Civil War with sealed orders. The orders, to be opened in the event that Great Britain or France entered the war on the side of the Confederacy, instructed the admirals of both fleets to report to Lincoln for orders. It’s also interesting to note that before Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves, Tsar Alexander issued an emancipation manifesto, freeing the Russian serfs. Huh. FDR, dealing with Stalin, set in place agreements for the postwar era that, had Truman not largely ignored them, might have prevented or at least minimized the Cold War. Huh again. (In the interest of full disclosure, I am an unrepentant Russophile who plays the balalaika, so there’s that to consider).
  4. While Trump’s statements are absurd and often disturbing, the fact remains that he basically has no record to speak of. In that sense, he’s a wild card; he might in fact be terrible, but he might also throw us a curveball by being all bark and no bite. The remaining republicans (including Hillary) on the other hand, all have proven records of near constant war mongering, wall street cronyism, influence peddling and general oligarchic myopia.
  5. The lesser evil has, especially in recent years, proven itself to be the more effective evil. Remember when W still occupied the white house? Remember how we had that large, vibrant anti-war movement with all those protests? (Well, if you watched the TV news, you probably didn’t see it, but trust me, it was there. I’ve got the memories, I’ll be happy to fill you in). Remember how that anti-war movement kept going after Obama was elected? No, you don’t, because the anti-war movement essentially dissolved as soon as the last ballot was cast in 2008. No one turned out to protest the war once the lesser evil was in charge, and what happened? The lesser evil ramped up drone strikes, kept troops on the ground, maintained Guantanamo, extended drone strikes into Pakistan, maintained and expanded domestic surveillance, indefinitely detained people without charging them and even claimed the right to kill citizens without trial (see NDAA). The greater evil would have faced major resistance every step of the way, but Obama got it all done with nary a whimper from his own party. It’s not inconceivable that a greater evil facing serious resistance might actually be better than the lesser evil acting with the tacit approval of the ones who should be resisting.
  6. You do realize that Ted Cruz is a Dominionist, right? I repeat: TED CRUZ IS A DOMINIONIST.

NOTE: I’m not suggesting that it’s ok to vote for Trump. I’m not sure there’s enough soap in Christendom to clean the hand that pulls that lever; I’m merely pointing out that one orange blowhard isn’t the apocalypse. Let’s try to maintain some kind of perspective, here – this country survived Warren G. Harding; we can handle Trump if we have to. And Ted Cruz IS A DOMINIONIST.

III.  Generational “analysis.”  The worst offenders here are center-left progressive media on the internet. I’ve been hearing a lot of generational explanations for the nature of the division of the vote, particularly on the democratic side. The whole “young people support Bernie because they get their news online instead of from the TV networks” line has popped up all over the place. This is stupid for the following reasons:

  1. The internet was largely constructed by boomers, and we Xers drove its early growth.
  2. This approach ignores the most obvious and historically consistent explanations, which, as usual, pertain primarily to economic class. Why should this also appear generational? Because the older generations are more likely to be established in the upper classes. It’s not complicated. This focus on generational differences is just another case of covering up class and pretending it’s not there. Why are young people struggling? Is it because they’re damn dirty millennials with no work ethic who don’t understand how the world really works? Or is it because they’re being forced into the ranks of the working poor through high youth unemployment, colossal student loan debt and flat wages? Generation gap politics, if you’re willing to scratch the surface a little, generally reveal themselves as just another way to avoid talking about class. The young aren’t mad because they’re young; they’re mad because they’re working class. I’ll freely admit that I’ve made my share of millennial jokes – why would anyone want to wear skinny jeans – but these kids have been screwed over even more than my generation. (And I probably shouldn’t call them kids; as a Carter era Xer, I’m barely older than them anyway, but it’s not my fault – pop demographers told me to hate them!).
  3. Anecdotal? Yes … nevertheless, let me point out that my retired boomer father spends significantly more time online than I do. Why? He’s retired. In fact, he’s probably reading this. Hi, dad! Sorry I’m still an insufferable smartass.
  4. Many of those online news sources aren’t any better than the major networks. For example, many of them utilize intellectually lazy “generation gap” analysis.

Wow, kind of lost my train of thought there. In any case, no savior is likely to spring up from all of this, but the more nakedly undemocratic it all becomes, the better. Look at that emperor pose!

A (Shitty) Year in Review

Posted in Capitalism, Economy, Elections, Israel-Palestine, Media, News, Politics, USA with tags , , , , , , on January 10, 2013 by Z

Happy new year.  Let’s review.  We’ll start small:

Status quo in another revolving door election between party A and party a.  (No other result was possible, so we classify this as small).

Stepping up now:

We were treated to the holy wisdom of Richard Mourdock from the heart of Indiana as he revealed to us the Almighty’s position on rape.  (A note on the lighter side: Shouldn’t someone who might be nicknamed “Dick” generally avoid commenting on gender issues?).

Moving on from troglodytic verbal gaffes, we reach domestic surveillance:

It seems the Occupy movement was closely watched by the FBI and Homeland Security even before the start of public protests.  Apparently, the FBI’s Memphis Joint Terrorism Task Force actually described Occupy as “domestic terrorism.”  Apparently, the FBI communicated their findings to corporate America.  So, what we have here are government agencies (the FBI and Homeland Security) coordinating a national crackdown on a nonviolent protest movement according to the needs of the cash engorged corporate world.  This is nothing less than part 2 of the Palmer Raids.  Why mention this now?  Well, because this surveillance is still going on as Occupy plans for the coming spring.

And now manipulating public opinion:

CNN decided to go ahead and selectively gather data on drone casualties from obviously suspect sources in order to cheerlead for Obama-as-war-president.  Here’s an article from The Atlantic that covers the bases, but frankly isn’t critical enough.

On to the real big leagues – death and wrongful imprisonment:

Gaza is still blockaded.

The drone wars of Bush-Obama continue to kill civilians.

Bradley Manning is still not free.

Leonard Peltier is still not free.

Mumia Abu-Jamal is still not free.  (Three is good enough for now.  We only have so much space, after all).

We had a school shooting, following which a president whose personally authorized drone attacks have killed more children than died at Sandy Hook gave what I can only consider a deeply hypocritical speech.  We then had to be dragged through the requisite media find-some-music-or-movie-or-videogame-to-blame-this-on routine before arriving at gun control as an issue.  Once there, the limit of the national discourse seems to be an assault weapons ban not substantially different from the one we had not too long ago.  (Never mind, of course, that that ban only expired in 2004; those of my generation who were finishing up high school in 1999 ought to be acutely aware that this ban was in effect during the Columbine shooting, so hooray for useless legislation).  There’s a great post over at SMBIVA suggesting what should have been obvious from day one: there’s a common element to all school shootings that no one seems to want to talk about – schools.  Check it out.

Finally, stuff of global import:

2012 was the warmest year on record, with tons of extreme weather.  Climate change deniers would be well advised to wear sunscreen when they go outside to yell at the rest of us about how climate change is a hoax.  Unless, of course, sun burns and skin cancer are also hoaxes.

The 2012 Mayan apocalypse failed spectacularly.  Granted, it was based largely on a blatant misinterpretation of Mayan beliefs.  But hey, at least a horde of ignorant rubbernecking tourists did irreparable damage to a couple of archaeological wonders as part of their world’s end party.

You know, I’m getting some serious déjà vu here.  In ’99, we had a horrible school shooting, I finished an academic program, and a prediction of apocalypse (Y2K) didn’t deliver.  In 2012, we had another horrible school shooting, I finished another academic program (if we include high school, that makes four now and still no lucrative, fulfilling career.  Ever wish you could place a call back in time to your high school guidance counselors?), and another apocalypse fizzled.

We lost both Alexander Cockburn and Gore Vidal.  I can only see this as a severe blow to the left and to the United States in general.  We don’t have that many good people left, and these losses only hasten the end of the era of the public intellectual, already being replaced with talking heads and credentialed idiots.  With Howard Zinn already gone, things look pretty bleak to me.  If Noam Chomsky, Jeffrey St. Clair and Cindy Sheehan ever travel anywhere together, maybe we should insist they take separate flights.  The flame is low, and there’s a big wind coming.  The liberals capitulated big time (again) and think the Democrats have saved them from some thug named Cliff whose nickname appears to be “Fiscal.”  As usual, there will be no meaningful help from them.  This year, my eyes will once again be on Occupy.  Here’s hoping.

 

On the bright side, I did read a pretty damn funny satire recently.  I’ll probably add more on that soon.

Post Thanksgiving Update 2: Black Friday, AKA American Thunderdome, or possibly Lumpenfest USA

Posted in Bad Faith, Capitalism, Economy, Media, News, USA with tags , , , , on December 4, 2012 by Z

What can be said about the uniquely American quasi-religious retail holiday known as Black Friday? This year’s observance happened to coincide with a Walmart worker’s strike that almost no one appeared to care about. Well, that’s not quite true; I’ve heard of several stories indicating that many shoppers expressed support for and approval of the Walmart strike – as they crossed the picket line to shop AT WALMART.  (This account of some of the more successful actions may lift spirits a little.  Let no one say I’m more than 95% gloom).  In addition, I’m aware of an incident of mass pepper spraying by a shopper looking for a cheap Xbox (California), two people shot dead in a Walmart parking lot over a parking space (Florida) and a man who tried to punch his way to the front of the line outside Sears, until he happened to attack a man with a concealed carry license, who drew his weapon and chased the attacker away (Texas). While I’ve never been a fan of concealed carry (if one must carry a weapon, surely open carry is both more honest and a better deterrent), the Texas Sears incident is probably the best argument in its favor I’ve yet seen. Of course, the Florida parking lot shooting seems a more potent argument against it.  But back to the matter at hand: How has this de facto holiday achieved such significance that people are prepared to kill for it? Why also do so many see no contradiction in indicating their approval of the Walmart strike even as they cross the picket line to shop at Walmart?

This second question is made more interesting in light of the revelation that the term “Black Friday” was used by factory managers in the 1950s not to refer to crowds of shoppers, but to the large number of workers who called in sick.  Only later did the day transition from a headache for manufacturing into a for profit free for all for retail. One might characterize the transition in this way: 1950s Black Friday was a day for workers to tell the boss “piss off, I’m extending my holiday and there’s nothing you can do about it,” while present day Black Friday is a day for consumers to say “it’s great that you’re standing up to this evil company I’m about to make more profitable. I’d stay home or shop elsewhere and actually support you in a meaningful way, but I can’t show any real solidarity. I mean, seriously dude – there are plasma screens at stake!” Between the violence and the disregard for workers, I think the following ought to be the official Black Friday slogan (or mission statement, if you’re the corporate type): “Plasmas over people!” This attitude shouldn’t surprise us. It makes perfect sense in the context of a society in which people have come to identify as consumers rather than workers.  This is what becomes of six decades of local news reports on who’s getting ripped off at the register instead of who’s getting ripped off on payday.  Yet the culture of Black Friday doesn’t really favor the consumer, either.  The desperate violence, after all, ultimately stems from the once a year availability of products that most consumers ordinarily can’t afford.  This is another effect of the worker-consumer disconnect. The exploitation of American workers is what sets the stage for the annual struggle over products that are temporarily affordable.  This is what leads to actual human beings calmly considering the pros and cons of unleashing pepper spray on their fellows in the name of savings, and this is what leaves us with shoppers who seem totally unaware that the bargains they’re hunting come at the direct expense of the striking workers they’re largely ignoring.  There is no understanding that the workers and consumers are the same people; even the workers and consumers themselves seem unaware of this.  Everything is simply part of the environment.  Deploying pepper spray against a rival for a game system seems as natural as two predators fighting over a gazelle carcass if it’s perceived as an environmental necessity.  Ignore the man behind the curtain, peon.  This contrived retail scenario has nothing to do with him.  Now face your opponent and fight to the death!  Two shoppers enter, one shopper leaves – with a discount!

Bad Faith 2012: Compact Summary of a Campaign

Posted in Elections, Media, Politics, USA with tags , , on August 6, 2012 by Z

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Marx marks the spot.

Bad Faith 2012: They aren’t out of touch, they’re just not talking to you.

Posted in Bad Faith, Elections, Media, News, Politics, USA with tags , , , , , , on May 30, 2012 by Z

The conventional wisdom regarding both Mitt Romney and Barack Obama (according to their respective opponents in the left and right wings of the American neoliberal party with two names) is that they’re “out of touch.”  This is a very appealing explanation, especially in the case of Romney with his alien demeanor and cavalier country club financial sense (bet you how much, Mitt?).  However, there’s a better explanation.   They just aren’t talking to you.  The conversation taking place between candidates, pundits, etc. not only during election years, but all the time doesn’t require input from the American public.  It fact, it doesn’t even want it.  This conversation is about our future, but it isn’t one we’re actually invited to; it’s merely taking place where we can hear it.

 

When Mitt Romney stood in front of a crowd of his loyal followers at a palatial mansion and suggested that everyone should be able to live “like this,” many rightly pointed out that the very suggestion was absurd.  Of course it’s not possible for everyone to have a mansion with a household staff and all the ridiculous luxuries associated with that lifestyle (it’s especially impossible for the members of the household staff).  Yet, the people who pointed this out missed the point.  Mitt knows full well that not everyone can live his lifestyle (again, especially not the household staff).  So what’s the secret that renders this insane attitude comprehensible?  Simple – if you think his statement was strange, he wasn’t talking to you.  He was talking to people who can live “like this.”  He was talking to people who do have the wealth, the connections and the desire to live “like this.”  The household staff, for example, are not included when Mitt says “everyone.”  Neither are most of us.  We aren’t the people in whose interests he wants to run the country, and we don’t have what he needs to get where he wants to go.  Consider also his laughable suggestion that young people borrow money from their parents to start a business.  “Is he serious?” many asked.  Well, yes he was – he just wasn’t talking to you.  How can you tell?  Easy – because either you don’t have enough money to lend your children to enable them to take his advice, or if you’re young, your parents don’t have enough to lend to you.  Or, and this is certainly outside of Mitt’s experience, you do have the necessary capital, but don’t want to be a business owner.  If any of these things are true, Mitt wasn’t talking to you.  In Mitt land, the solution to your problems is to become a business owner.  If your class, your interests or your financial situation prevent you from doing this, Mitt doesn’t think your problems need solving.  You are a non person.

 

Barack Obama may take a slightly different approach, but offers the same result.  He’ll talk to us – I understand we’re meant to hope for change, or some such – but his policies, as noted elsewhere, are more or less the same as his predecessor’s.  Keep hoping, I guess.  The nice boss (Obama) talks to his employees while he exploits them, while the traditional boss (Romney) is content to let the rabble believe he’s talking to them.  Meanwhile, the neoliberal policy agenda marches on.

 

Public political discourse in the US remains confined to a ruling class.  This ruling class is more eclectic than it once was, as it includes both the traditional 1%er types and a class of professional politicians, but in most cases debate about policy remains firmly in the narrow neoliberal frame long laid out for us.  This is because the people participating in this debate don’t want our input.  We are allowed to fool ourselves into believing that we’re included, but the truth is that we’re spectators.  We can observe this public discourse through the mass media, but our input is neither welcomed nor necessary.  The position of the general public is not unlike that of a household servant.  The masters of the house, our employers, are arguing over how best to run their household, including how to treat us.  We are in the room, we can see and hear the discussion, but although we may convince ourselves that we’re involved, we are not.  Our access to the political process is largely coincidental at this point.  We can see it on TV, but attempting to contribute in the traditional way is a bit like yelling at game show contestants.  The folks on Wheel of Fortune can’t hear you, and neither can your political class.  Not only that, they aren’t even talking to you.

 

A Quick Word on May Day

Posted in Media, News, Politics with tags , , on May 6, 2012 by Z

As usual whenever anyone protests anything pertaining to class in the US, the blinders were on throughout the country.  I’ve seen quite a variety in crowd size estimates for the various May Day marches all over the states last week, most of them suspiciously low if half of what I see outside of professional media outlets is true.  More irritating is the realization that had I not deliberately sought out May Day related news, I might never have known anything had happened at all.  Fortunately, history is harder to derail by manipulating public discourse while actual political action is ongoing.  Both frantic denunciations and faux-oblivious silence sound eerily like a superstitous man whistling past the graveyard when they’re coming out of American “news” professionals.  Coverage or no coverage, the May Day rallies around the US (not to mention the rest of the world, where they were even bigger) show that the Occupy movement is going strong, and can organize in pretty much any city it needs to.

Of all the things that might come out of this, I hope most of all that it will put the US on a path that will bring back May Day in a country that has all but forgotten it.  Forget Labor Day.  A day to celebrate labor and the power of workers should be international.

Death and the Private Public

Posted in Capitalism, Media, News, USA with tags , , on March 25, 2012 by Z

The Trayvon Martin shooting has provoked a number of reactions throughout the internet and beyond, from the predictable (but reasonable) “If Trayvon had been white, Zimmerman would have been arrested” to the predictable (but pants-on-head retarded) “Well, he musta done sumthin.”  We were even treated to the Geraldo Rivera “hoodie as universal gang uniform” thesis (Uh oh – I’m pretty sure I own a couple of those.  I’d better check myself for gang tattoos and concealed weapons).  The prez went so far as to point out that if he had a son, he would have looked like Trayvon.  Sweet, I guess, although it does sound exactly like the sort of fundamentally noncommittal comment one might make in an election year to give Trayvon supporters the impression that one is on their side without giving that same impression to their (presumably white) detractors.  I’m going to focus on something else: gated communities.

Given the flood of coverage on the shooting, I initially thought one professional or another would comment on this at some point, but then I remembered that metastasized capitalism and private property worship are invisible to the mainstream media in the same way that water is invisible to fish.  That being the case, I’ll take a shot myself.  The gated community always struck me as suspiciously neo feudal: a quasi-public space arbitrarily cordoned off at the whim of some bearer(s) of accumulated capital for the alleged benefit of its wealthy and/or indebted inhabitants.  This is exactly the sort of ill defined space one might expect to see in a nation where a rigid and impractical conception of private property is asserting itself.  You know, like the US.  It is also the sort of space that appeals immediately to the aspiring and/or failed law enforcers among us (like George Zimmerman).  The private property designation carries a sort of “keep off my lawn” mentality right along with it that gives delusional fans of the “Law and Order” family of police procedural dramas an excuse to play cop (minus the actual training, knowledge of the law, etc. – but racial stereotypes, of course, remain constant).  Outside of a gated community, a “self-appointed neighborhood watchman” as Zimmerman has been called, is known as a nosy neighbor.  People don’t like nosy neighbors.  Cops tend to become frustrated with nuisance calls from nosy neighbors.  Add a gated community, however, and you get a “self appointed neighborhood watchman.”  Add a gun, and you get a vigilante with a sense of power and entitlement.  I can’t help but think that even a nut like Zimmerman would think twice before following an innocent teen down a public street.  Gated communities introduce the logic of private property to areas that should be public.  Lords of the manor (like Zimmerman) or private security guards who would otherwise not perform such functions are suddenly endowed with (or believe they are endowed with) police powers.  Public space becomes an extension of the private home.  Not cool, America.  The whole mess reeks of the misapplication of the classical Lockean conception of private property in which a titular owner has absolute control of his/her/their property, as though only they had a stake in its use.  Zimmerman’s apparent attitude – that Trayvon Martin had no interest in (or indeed right to) the streets of the Retreat at Twin Lakes gated community is a symptom of this absurd conceit.  Trayvon had a clear interest in the streets: he was walking home on them.  Even if we ignore the obvious problems with Florida’s “Stand your ground” law, even if we ignore the role of racism, there is one thing we cannot ignore: we are a society that has apparently decided that a young man’s right to life doesn’t stack up to a suburbanite’s right to a private neighborhood.  Not cool, America.